affix

[ verb uh-fiks; noun af-iks ]
/ verb əˈfɪks; noun ˈæf ɪks /

verb (used with object)

to fasten, join, or attach (usually followed by to): to affix stamps to a letter.
to put or add on; append: to affix a signature to a contract.
to impress (a seal or stamp).
to attach (blame, reproach, ridicule, etc.).

noun

something that is joined or attached.
Grammar. a bound inflectional or derivational element, as a prefix, infix, or suffix, added to a base or stem to form a fresh stem or a word, as -ed added to want to form wanted, or im- added to possible to form impossible.

Nearby words

  1. affirmative,
  2. affirmative action,
  3. affirmative flag,
  4. affirmatively,
  5. affirmatory,
  6. affixation,
  7. affixture,
  8. afflated,
  9. afflatus,
  10. afflict


Origin of affix

1525–35; < Latin affīxus fastened to (past participle of affīgere), equivalent to af- af- + fīg- fasten + -sus, variant of -tus past participle suffix

Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for affix


British Dictionary definitions for affix

affix

verb (əˈfɪks) (tr; usually foll by to or on)

to attach, fasten, join, or stickto affix a poster to the wall
to add or appendto affix a signature to a document
to attach or attribute (guilt, blame, etc)

noun (ˈæfɪks)

a linguistic element added to a word or root to produce a derived or inflected form: -ment in establishment is a derivational affix; -s in drowns is an inflectional affixSee also prefix, suffix, infix
something fastened or attached; appendage
Derived Formsaffixation (ˌæfɪkˈseɪʃən) or affixture (əˈfɪkstʃə), noun

Word Origin for affix

C15: from Medieval Latin affixāre, from ad- to + fixāre to fix

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for affix
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper