aggie

1
[ag-ee]
See more synonyms for aggie on Thesaurus.com

Origin of aggie

1
First recorded in 1875–80

aggie

2
[ag-ee]
noun (sometimes initial capital letter) Informal.
  1. an agriculture college.
  2. a student at an agricultural college.

Origin of aggie

2
An Americanism dating back to 1900–05; ag(ricultural) + -ie

Aggie

[ag-ee]
noun
  1. a female given name, form of Agatha or Agnes.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for aggie

Contemporary Examples of aggie

Historical Examples of aggie

  • In such directions, Aggie was the leader, an eager, joyous one always.

    Within the Law

    Marvin Dana

  • "Why, he copped the copper's kale," Aggie translated, glibly.

    Within the Law

    Marvin Dana

  • For that reason, Aggie Lynch was not actively offensive, as were most of the others.

    Within the Law

    Marvin Dana

  • "But I can't see——" Aggie began to argue with the petulance of a spoiled child.

    Within the Law

    Marvin Dana

  • Again, Aggie studied him with a swift glance of interrogation.

    Within the Law

    Marvin Dana


Word Origin and History for aggie
n.1

"college student studying agriculture," by 1880, American English college slang, from agriculture + -ie.

n.2

type of toy marble, by 1905, American English, colloquial shortening of agate (q.v.).

Excited groups gather about rude circles scratched in the mud, and there is talk of "pureys," and "reals," and "aggies," and "commies," and "fen dubs!" There is a rich click about the bulging pockets of the boys, and every so often in school time something drops on the floor and rolls noisily across the room. When Miss Daniels asks: "Who did that?" the boys all look so astonished. Who did what pray tell? ["McClure's Magazine," May 1905]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper