agile

[ aj-uhl, -ahyl ]
/ ˈædʒ əl, -aɪl /

adjective

quick and well-coordinated in movement; lithe: an agile leap.
active; lively: an agile person.
marked by an ability to think quickly; mentally acute or aware: She's 95 and still very agile.
noting or relating to a philosophy of product development and production intended to create and distribute batches of working products in a short period of time with subsequent batches planned in a cyclical schedule of improvement, production, and distribution: agile software programming;agile manufacturing;agile teams.Compare waterfall (def. 3). See also Agile development.

noun

Sometimes Agile . an iterative and collaborative philosophy of rapid product development and production: Agile is being used by more and more companies outside of the tech sector.

QUIZZES

DON’T VACILLATE! VANQUISH THIS WORD OF THE DAY QUIZ!

It’d be a real faux pas to miss this quiz on the words from August 3–9, 2020!
Question 1 of 7
What does “vacillate” mean?

Origin of agile

First recorded in 1570–80; earlier agill, from Middle French agile “nimble” and Latin agilis “easily moved, moving easily,” equivalent to ag- (base of agere “to do, drive”) + -ilis -ile

OTHER WORDS FROM agile

ag·ile·ly, adverbag·ile·ness, nounun·ag·ile, adjectiveun·ag·ile·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for agile

British Dictionary definitions for agile

agile
/ (ˈædʒaɪl) /

adjective

quick in movement; nimble
mentally quick or acute

Derived forms of agile

agilely, adverbagility (əˈdʒɪlɪtɪ), noun

Word Origin for agile

C15: from Latin agilis, from agere to do, act
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012