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Akkadian

or Ac·ca·di·an

[uh-key-dee-uh n, uh-kah-]
noun
  1. the eastern Semitic language, now extinct, of Assyria and Babylonia, written with a cuneiform script.
  2. one of the Akkadian people.
  3. Obsolete. Sumerian.
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adjective
  1. of or belonging to Akkad.
  2. of or relating to the eastern Semitic language called Akkadian.
  3. Obsolete. Sumerian.
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Origin of Akkadian

First recorded in 1850–55; Akkad + -ian
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for akkadian

Historical Examples of akkadian

  • Mr. G. Bertin, the Akkadian scholar, favours the same conclusion.

    Palestine

    Claude Reignier Conder

  • A god called Uz has for his name the Akkadian word for goat.

  • The strange god Uz, probably an Akkadian survival, was worshipped under the form of a goat.

  • The word and the idea which it contains are equally Semitic, but strangely enough it has an Akkadian origin.

  • By a long process of research, Mr. Brown finds his word in ancient ‘Akkadian.’

    Custom and Myth

    Andrew Lang


British Dictionary definitions for akkadian

Akkadian

Accadian

noun
  1. a member of an ancient Semitic people who lived in central Mesopotamia in the third millennium bc
  2. the extinct language of this people, belonging to the E Semitic subfamily of the Afro-Asiatic family
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adjective
  1. of or relating to this people or their language
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for akkadian

Akkadian

1855, from Akkad (Sumerian Agde, Biblical Acca), name of city founded by Sargon I in northern Babylonia, of unknown origin; applied by modern scholars to the east Semitic language spoken there (c.2300-2100 B.C.E.) and preserved in cuneiform inscriptions.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper