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View synonyms for alimony

alimony

[ al-uh-moh-nee ]

noun

  1. Law. an allowance paid to a person by that person's spouse or former spouse for maintenance, granted by a court upon a legal separation or a divorce or while action is pending.
  2. supply of the means of living; maintenance.


alimony

/ ˈælɪmənɪ /

noun

  1. law (formerly) an allowance paid under a court order by one spouse to another when they are separated but not divorced See also maintenance


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Other Words From

  • ali·monied adjective

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Word History and Origins

Origin of alimony1

First recorded in 1645–55; from Latin alimōnia “nourishment, sustenance,” from ali- (stem of alere “to feed, nourish, support”) + -mōnia -mony; aliment

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Word History and Origins

Origin of alimony1

C17: from Latin alimōnia sustenance, from alere to nourish

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Compare Meanings

How does alimony compare to similar and commonly confused words? Explore the most common comparisons:

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Example Sentences

In her later years, Larsen worked as a nurse after her alimony from her then-ex-husband stopped after his death.

From Time

Some want to retain Social Security benefits or alimony from a former spouse.

From Time

Use this form for any income that isn’t subject to withholding, like earnings from self-employment, rent paid to you and alimony.

More specifically, she is using his death as a rallying cry for alimony reform and raising the question: Is alimony anti-feminist?

Today, New Jersey, Oregon, Vermont, Connecticut, North Carolina, West Virginia, and Florida all have lifetime alimony statutes.

“I am a fan of alimony reform and I am a fan of the law Massachusetts passed in 2011,” Wood told me.

And today, the critics of lifetime alimony are not just husbands and their new wives.

In the last three decades, courts have begun to apply gender parity to the awarding of alimony.

In Ireland the mother is not allowed to claim alimony herself—she must go into the workhouse and the guardians must sue for her.

Until he had met Rue Carew he had taken measures to fight the statutory charges, hoping to involve Venem and escape alimony.

In a recent suit for alimony a wealthy New Yorker complained that his wife used a diamond-studded watch for a golf tee.

Nothing in the nature of alimony, except the dwelling, is commonly given by either party to a divorce.

The lady's lawyer thereupon moved for the appointment of a referee, as well as for counsel fee and alimony.

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alimentativeà l'improviste