amble

[ am-buhl ]
/ ˈæm bəl /

verb (used without object), am·bled, am·bling.

to go at a slow, easy pace; stroll; saunter: He ambled around the town.
(of a horse) to go at a slow pace with the legs moving in lateral pairs and usually having a four-beat rhythm.

noun

an ambling gait.
a slow, easy walk or gentle pace.
a stroll.

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decorum

Origin of amble

1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French ambler < Latin ambulāre to walk, equivalent to amb- ambi- + -ulāre to step (*-el- + stem vowel -ā-; cognate with Welsh el- may go, Greek elaúnein to set in motion)

OTHER WORDS FROM amble

am·bler, nounam·bling·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for ambled

British Dictionary definitions for ambled

amble
/ (ˈæmbəl) /

verb (intr)

to walk at a leisurely relaxed pace
(of a horse) to move slowly, lifting both legs on one side together
to ride a horse at an amble or leisurely pace

noun

a leisurely motion in walking
a leisurely walk
the ambling gait of a horse

Derived forms of amble

ambler, noun

Word Origin for amble

C14: from Old French ambler, from Latin ambulāre to walk
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012