embed

[verb em-bed; noun em-bed]

verb (used with object), em·bed·ded, em·bed·ding.

verb (used without object), em·bed·ded, em·bed·ding.

to be or become fixed or incorporated, as into a surrounding mass: Glass embeds in the soft tar of the road.

noun

a journalist who is embedded with a military unit or a political campaign.
a period of time during which a journalist is embedded.

Also imbed.

Origin of embed

First recorded in 1770–80; em-1 + bed
Related formsem·bed·ment, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for embed


British Dictionary definitions for embed

embed

imbed

verb -beds, -bedding or -bedded

(usually foll by in) to fix or become fixed firmly and deeply in a surrounding solid massto embed a nail in wood
(tr) to surround closelyhard rock embeds the roots
(tr) to fix or retain (a thought, idea, etc) in the mind
(often foll by with) to assign a journalist or be assigned as one to accompany an active military unit
(tr) grammar to insert (a subordinate clause) into a sentence

noun (ˈɪmbɛd)

a journalist accompanying an active military unit
Derived Formsembedment, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for embed
v.

1778, from em- + bed (n.). Originally a geological term, in reference to fossils in rock; figurative sense is from 1835; meaning "place a journalist within a military unit at war" is 2003. Related: Embedded; embedding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper