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amenorrhea

or a·men·or·rhoe·a

[ey-men-uh-ree-uh, uh-men-]
noun Pathology.
  1. absence of the menses.
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Origin of amenorrhea

First recorded in 1795–1805; a-6 + meno- + -rrhea
Related formsa·men·or·rhe·al, a·men·or·rhoe·al, a·men·or·rhe·ic, a·men·or·rhoe·ic, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for amenorrhea

Historical Examples

  • The amenorrhea from exhaustive diseases will usually correct itself with, or soon after, the establishment of convalescence.

    The Eugenic Marriage, Vol 2 (of 4)

    W. Grant Hague

  • For this reason it is safe to disregard the amenorrhea and build up the bodily strength.

  • According to the claims in the circular quoted above, it is useful both in amenorrhea and in menorrhagia.

  • One case of amenorrhea I saw in recent years proved to be due to a beginning acromegaly.

    Psychotherapy

    James J. Walsh

  • Occasionally diseases of other ductless glands, as the thyroid, may have amenorrhea as one of the first symptoms.

    Psychotherapy

    James J. Walsh


Word Origin and History for amenorrhea

n.

1804, Modern Latin, from Greek privative prefix a- "not" (see a- (3)) + men "month" (see moon (n.)) + rhein "to flow" (see rheum). Related: amenorrheal.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

amenorrhea in Medicine

amenorrhea

n.
  1. Abnormal suppression or absence of menstruation.menostasis
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Related formsa•men′or•rheal adj.a•men′or•rheic adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

amenorrhea in Science

amenorrhea

[ā-mĕn′ə-rēə]
  1. The absence of menstruation in a woman between puberty and menopause. Some causes include pregnancy, decreased body weight, endocrine and other medical disorders, and certain medications.
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The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.