amice

1
[ am-is ]
/ ˈæm ɪs /

noun Ecclesiastical.

an oblong vestment, usually of white linen, worn about the neck and shoulders and partly under the alb.

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Origin of amice

1
1200–50; Middle English amice(s) <Old French amis,amys, plural of amit<Latin amictus mantle, cloak, equivalent to amic-, base of amicīre to wrap around (am-ambi- + -ic-, combining stem of iacere to throw) + -tus noun suffix of verbal action (hence, originally the act of wrapping around)

Definition for amice (2 of 2)

amice2
[ am-is ]
/ ˈæm ɪs /

noun

Origin of amice

2
late Middle English amisse<Middle French aumusse, aumuce<Spanish almucio<Latin almucia, almucium
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for amice

British Dictionary definitions for amice (1 of 3)

amice1
/ (ˈæmɪs) /

noun

Christianity a rectangular piece of white linen worn by priests around the neck and shoulders under the alb or, formerly, on the head

Word Origin for amice

C15: from Old French amis, plural of amit, or from Medieval Latin amicia, both from Latin amictus cloak, from amicīre to clothe, from am- ambi- + iacere to throw

British Dictionary definitions for amice (2 of 3)

amice2
/ (ˈæmɪs) /

noun

another word for almuce

British Dictionary definitions for amice (3 of 3)

AMICE

abbreviation for

Associate Member of the Institution of Civil Engineers
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012