amora

[uh-mawr-uh, uh-mohr-uh]
noun, plural a·mo·ra·im [ah-maw-rah-im, ah-moh-] /ˌɑ mɔˈrɑ ɪm, ˌɑ moʊ-/. (often initial capital letter) Judaism.
  1. one of a group of Jewish scholars, active in the rabbinical academies of Palestine and Babylonia from the 3rd to the 6th centuries a.d., whose commentaries on and interpretations of the Mishnah comprise the Palestinian and Babylonian Gemaras.
Compare sabora, tanna.

Origin of amora

From the Hebrew word āmōrā' interpreter
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for amora

Historical Examples of amora

  • Arch Brookhouse and his brother, Louis, had both been students at Amora.

    Out of a Labyrinth

    Lawrence L. Lynch

  • Mr. Larkins manifested a desire to know the name of my Amora acquaintance, and was promptly enlightened.

    Out of a Labyrinth

    Lawrence L. Lynch

  • He was said to live somewhere between Amora and Sharon, perhaps here I could learn the precise location of his abiding place.

    Out of a Labyrinth

    Lawrence L. Lynch

  • Very little could be learned concerning Amy Holmes, previous to her coming to Amora.

    Out of a Labyrinth

    Lawrence L. Lynch

  • Then, with a condescending smile as he drew on his right glove, "Know anybody at Amora?"

    Out of a Labyrinth

    Lawrence L. Lynch