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amoral

[ ey-mawr-uhl, a-mawr-, ey-mor-, a-mor- ]
/ eɪˈmɔr əl, æˈmɔr-, eɪˈmɒr-, æˈmɒr- /
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adjective

not involving questions of right or wrong; without moral quality; neither moral nor immoral.
having no moral standards, restraints, or principles; unaware of or indifferent to questions of right or wrong: a completely amoral person.

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Origin of amoral

First recorded in 1880–85; a-6 + moral

synonym study for amoral

See immoral.

OTHER WORDS FROM amoral

a·mor·al·ism, nouna·mo·ral·i·ty [ey-muh-ral-i-tee, am-uh-], /ˌeɪ məˈræl ɪ ti, ˌæm ə-/, nouna·mor·al·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for amoral

British Dictionary definitions for amoral

amoral
/ (eɪˈmɒrəl) /

adjective

having no moral quality; nonmoral
without moral standards or principles

Derived forms of amoral

amorality (ˌeɪmɒˈrælɪtɪ), nounamorally, adverb

usage for amoral

Amoral is often wrongly used where immoral is meant. Immoral is properly used to talk about the breaking of moral rules, amoral about people who have no moral code or about places or situations where moral considerations do not apply
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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