Angora

[ang-gawr-uh, -gohr-uh, an- for 1–3, 5–7; ang-gawr-uh, -gohr-uh, ang-ger-uh for 4]
adjective
  1. (usually lowercase) made from a yarn or fabric of the hairs of the Angora goat or Angora rabbit: an angora sweater.

Origin of Angora

First recorded in 1825–35; variant of Ankara
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for angora

Historical Examples of angora

  • Deer, Angora goats, hares, and trout have been also introduced.

  • It was much nicer upstairs in the nursery with Mimi, the Angora cat.

  • The suppleness of the Angora's tail is also a mark of fine breeding.

    Concerning Cats

    Helen M. Winslow

  • The tail of the Angora serves as a barometer of its bodily and mental condition.

    Concerning Cats

    Helen M. Winslow

  • It is but a few years since the craze for the Angora cat started.

    Concerning Cats

    Helen M. Winslow


British Dictionary definitions for angora

angora

noun (sometimes capital)
    1. the long soft hair of the outer coat of the Angora goat or the fur of the Angora rabbit
    2. yarn, cloth, or clothing made from this hair
    3. a material made to resemble this yarn or cloth
    4. (as modifier)an angora sweater See also mohair

Word Origin for angora

from angora, former name of Ankara, in Turkey

Angora

noun
  1. (æŋˈɡɔːrə, ˈæŋɡərə) the former name (until 1930) of Ankara
  2. (æŋˈɡɔːrə) short for Angora cat, Angora goat, Angora rabbit
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for angora
n.

type of wool, 1810, from Angora, city in central Turkey (ancient Ancyra, modern Ankara), which gave its name to the goat (1745 in English), and to its silk-like wool, and to a cat whose fur resembles it (1771 in English). The city name is from the Greek word for "anchor, bend" (see angle (n.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper