aquamanile

[ ak-wuh-muh-nahy-lee, ah-kwuh-muh-nee-ley ]
/ ˌæk wə məˈnaɪ li, ˌɑ kwə məˈni leɪ /

noun, plural aq·ua·ma·ni·les [ak-wuh-muh-nahy-leez, ah-kwuh-muh-nee-leys] /ˌæk wə məˈnaɪ liz, ˌɑ kwə məˈni leɪs/, aq·ua·ma·nil·i·a [ak-wuh-muh-nil-ee-uh, ah-kwuh-] /ˌæk wə məˈnɪl i ə, ˌɑ kwə-/.

a medieval ewer, often made in grotesque animal forms.
Ecclesiastical. a basin used by a celebrant for washing the hands during the saying of the Mass.

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Origin of aquamanile

1870–75; < Medieval Latin, Late Latin: alteration (perhaps by association with manus hand) of Latin aquimināle, aquae mānāle ewer, equivalent to aquae, genitive of aqua water + mānāle (or manāle), perhaps derivative of mānāre to flow, pour
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020