Arminianism

[ahr-min-ee-uh-niz-uh m]
noun Theology.
  1. the doctrinal teachings of Jacobus Arminius or his followers, especially the doctrine that Christ died for all people and not only for the elect.Compare Calvinism(def 1).

Origin of Arminianism

1610–20; J. Armini(us) + -an + -ism
Related formsAr·min·i·an, adjective, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

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British Dictionary definitions for arminian

Arminian

adjective
  1. denoting, relating to, or believing in the Christian Protestant doctrines of Jacobus Arminius, published in 1610, which rejected absolute predestination and insisted that the sovereignty of God is compatible with free will in man. These doctrines deeply influenced Wesleyan and Methodist theology
noun
  1. a follower of such doctrines
Derived FormsArminianism, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for arminian

Arminian

1610s, from Arminius, Latinized form of the name of James Harmensen (1560-1609), Dutch Protestant theologian who opposed Calvin, especially on the question of predestination. His ideas were denounced at the Synod of Dort, but nonetheless spread in the Reformed churches.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper