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astonish

[uh-ston-ish]
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verb (used with object)
  1. to fill with sudden and overpowering surprise or wonder; amaze: Her easy humor and keen intellect astonished me.
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Origin of astonish

1525–35; Middle English astonyen, astonen, probably < dialectal Old French *astoner, Old French estoner < Vulgar Latin *extonāre, for Latin attonāre to strike with lightning, equivalent to ex- ex-1, at- at- + tonāre to thunder; extended by -ish2, perhaps reflecting Anglo-French *astonir < dialectal Old French
Related formsas·ton·ished·ly, adverbas·ton·ish·er, nounsu·per·as·ton·ish, verbun·as·ton·ished, adjective

Synonyms

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Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words

dumbfoundbewilderoverwhelmflabbergastshockastoundboggleconfoundamazestartledazestupefystunstaggerfloor

Examples from the Web for astonish

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • But this does not astonish us when we understand the difficulties which he was obliged to solve.

    Ancient Man

    Hendrik Willem van Loon

  • "Why, certainly I was," said Linda, wide eyed with astonish meet.

    Her Father's Daughter

    Gene Stratton-Porter

  • But after what he had heard nothing could astonish him any more.

    The Secret Agent

    Joseph Conrad

  • Mr. Solmes has something to open to you, that will astonish you—and you shall hear it.

    Clarissa, Volume 2 (of 9)

    Samuel Richardson

  • There is another manifestation of his power which will astonish those who consider it.

    A Dish Of Orts

    George MacDonald


British Dictionary definitions for astonish

astonish

verb
  1. (tr) to fill with amazement; surprise greatly
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Word Origin

C15: from earlier astonyen (see astonied), from Old French estoner, from Vulgar Latin extonāre (unattested) to strike with thunder, from Latin tonāre to thunder
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for astonish

v.

c.1300, astonien, from Old French estoner "to stun, daze, deafen, astound," from Vulgar Latin *extonare, from Latin ex- "out" + tonare "to thunder" (see thunder); so, literally "to leave someone thunderstruck." The modern form (influenced by English verbs in -ish, e.g. distinguish, diminish) is attested from c.1530.

No wonder is thogh that she were astoned [Chaucer, "Clerk's Tale"]

Related: Astonished; astonishing; astonishingly.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper