definitions
  • synonyms

boggle

1
[ bog-uh l ]
/ ˈbɒg əl /
|
SEE MORE SYNONYMS FOR boggle ON THESAURUS.COM

verb (used with object), bog·gled, bog·gling.

to overwhelm or bewilder, as with the magnitude, complexity, or abnormality of: The speed of light boggles the mind.
to bungle; botch.

verb (used without object), bog·gled, bog·gling.

noun

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RELATED WORDS

startle, flabbergast, astound, overwhelm, amaze, shock

Nearby words

bogey-hole, bogeyman, boggart, bogger, bogging, boggle, boggle the mind, boggler, boggy, boghazkeui, boghazköy

Origin of boggle

1
First recorded in 1590–1600; perhaps from boggle2
Related formsbog·gling·ly, adverb

Definition for boggle (2 of 2)

boggle

2
[ bog-uh l ]
/ ˈbɒg əl /

noun

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for boggle

British Dictionary definitions for boggle

boggle

/ (ˈbɒɡəl) /

verb (intr often foll by at)

to be surprised, confused, or alarmed (esp in the phrase the mind boggles)
to hesitate or be evasive when confronted with a problem
(tr) to baffle; bewilder; puzzle

Word Origin for boggle

C16: probably variant of bogle 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for boggle

boggle


v.

1590s, "to start with fright" (as a startled horse does), from Middle English bugge "specter" (among other things, supposed to scare horses at night); see bug (n.); also cf. bogey (n.1). The meaning "to raise scruples, hesitate" is from 1630s. Related: Boggled; boggling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper