issue

[ ish-oo or, esp. British, is-yoo ]
/ ˈɪʃ u or, esp. British, ˈɪs yu /

noun

verb (used with object), is·sued, is·su·ing.

verb (used without object), is·sued, is·su·ing.

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Idioms for issue

Origin of issue

1275–1325; (noun) Middle English < Middle French: place or passage out; Old French (e)issue < Vulgar Latin *exūta, noun use of feminine of *exūtus, Latin exitus exit1; (v.) Middle English issuen, derivative of the noun, or < Middle French, Old French (e)issu, past participle of issir to go out (≪ Latin exīre); see exit2

SYNONYMS FOR issue

5, 7 crux.
25 See emerge.
28 flow, emanate, arise, spring.
29 ensue.

OTHER WORDS FROM issue

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for at issue

issue
/ (ˈɪʃuː, ˈɪsjuː) /

noun

verb -sues, -suing or -sued

Derived forms of issue

issueless, adjectiveissuer, noun

Word Origin for issue

C13: from Old French eissue way out, from eissir to go out, from Latin exīre, from ex- 1 + īre to go
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for at issue

issue
[ ĭshōō ]

n.

A discharge, as of blood or pus.
A lesion, a wound, or an ulcer that produces a discharge of this sort.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Idioms and Phrases with at issue (1 of 2)

at issue

1

In question, under discussion; also, to be decided. For example, Who will pay for the refreshments was the point at issue. [Early 1800s]

2

In conflict, in disagreement, as in Physicians are still at issue over the appropriate use of hormone therapy. This usage, from legal terminology, was defined by Sir William Blackstone (Commentaries on the Laws of England, 1768), who said that when a point is affirmed by one side and denied by the other, “they are then said to be at issue.”

Idioms and Phrases with at issue (2 of 2)

issue

see at issue; take issue with.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.