atone

[ uh-tohn ]
/ əˈtoʊn /

verb (used without object), a·toned, a·ton·ing.

to make amends or reparation, as for an offense or a crime, or for an offender (usually followed by for): to atone for one's sins.
to make up, as for errors or deficiencies (usually followed by for): to atone for one's failings.
Obsolete. to become reconciled; agree.

verb (used with object), a·toned, a·ton·ing.

to make amends for; expiate: He atoned his sins.
Obsolete. to bring into unity, harmony, concord, etc.

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Origin of atone

First recorded in 1545–55; back formation from atonement

OTHER WORDS FROM atone

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for atone

British Dictionary definitions for atone

atone
/ (əˈtəʊn) /

verb

(intr foll by for) to make amends or reparation (for a crime, sin, etc)
(tr) to expiateto atone a guilt with repentance
obsolete to be in or bring into agreement

Derived forms of atone

atonable or atoneable, adjectiveatoner, noun

Word Origin for atone

C16: back formation from atonement
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with atone

at one

In agreement, in harmony, as in John and Pat were at one on every subject except her cat, which made him sneeze, or Springtime always makes me feel at one with nature. [1300s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.