definitions
  • synonyms

bail

4
[ beyl ]
/ beɪl /
|

noun

Cricket. either of the two small bars or sticks laid across the tops of the stumps which form the wicket.
British, Australian. a bar, framework, partition, or the like, for confining or separating cows, horses, etc., in a stable.
bails, Obsolete. the wall of an outer court of a feudal castle.

Verb Phrases

bail up, Australian.
  1. to confine a cow for milking, as in a bail.
  2. to force (one) to surrender or identify oneself or to state one's business.
  3. to waylay or rob (someone).

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Nearby words

baiae, baidarka, baigneuse, baikal, baikonur, bail, bail bond, bail bondsman, bail out, bail up, bailable

Idioms

    bail up! Australian. (the cry of challenge of a pioneer or person living in the bush.)

Origin of bail

4
1350–1400; Middle English baile < Old French < Latin bacula, plural of baculum stick
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for bail up (1 of 5)

bail up


verb (adverb)

Australian and NZ informal to confine (a cow) or (of a cow) to be confined by the head in a bailSee bail 3
(tr) Australian history (of a bushranger) to hold under guard in order to rob
(intr) Australian to submit to robbery without offering resistance
(tr) Australian informal to accost or detain, esp in conversation; buttonhole

British Dictionary definitions for bail up (2 of 5)

bail

1
/ (beɪl) law /

noun

a sum of money by which a person is bound to take responsibility for the appearance in court of another person or himself or herself, forfeited if the person fails to appear
the person or persons so binding themselves; surety
the system permitting release of a person from custody where such security has been takenhe was released on bail
jump bail or formal forfeit bail to fail to appear in court to answer to a charge
stand bail or go bail to act as surety (for someone)

verb (tr)

(often foll by out) to release or obtain the release of (a person) from custody, security having been made
See also bail out

Word Origin for bail

C14: from Old French: custody, from baillier to hand over, from Latin bāiulāre to carry burdens, from bāiulus carrier, of obscure origin

British Dictionary definitions for bail up (3 of 5)

bail

2

bale

/ (beɪl) /

verb

(often foll by out) to remove (water) from (a boat)
Derived Formsbailer or baler, noun

Word Origin for bail

C13: from Old French baille bucket, from Latin bāiulus carrier

British Dictionary definitions for bail up (4 of 5)

bail

3
/ (beɪl) /

noun

cricket either of two small wooden bars placed across the tops of the stumps to form the wicket
agriculture
  1. a partition between stalls in a stable or barn, for horses
  2. a portable dairy house built on wheels or skids
Australian and NZ a framework in a cowshed used to secure the head of a cow during milking

verb

Word Origin for bail

C18: from Old French baile stake, fortification, probably from Latin baculum stick

British Dictionary definitions for bail up (5 of 5)

bail

4

bale

/ (beɪl) /

noun

the semicircular handle of a kettle, bucket, etc
a semicircular support for a canopy
a movable bar on a typewriter that holds the paper against the platen

Word Origin for bail

C15: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse beygja to bend
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with bail up

bail


In addition to the idiom beginning with bail

  • bail out

also see:

  • make bail
  • out on bail
  • skip bail
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.