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baluster

[ bal-uh-ster ]
/ ˈbæl ə stər /
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noun

Architecture. any of a number of closely spaced supports for a railing.
balusters, a balustrade.
any of various symmetrical supports, as furniture legs or spindles, tending to swell toward the bottom or top.

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Origin of baluster

1595–1605; <French, Middle French balustre<Italian balaustro pillar shaped like the calyx of the pomegranate flower, ultimately <Latin balaustium<Greek balaústion pomegranate flower

OTHER WORDS FROM baluster

bal·us·tered, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH baluster

baluster , balustrade, banister
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use baluster in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for baluster

baluster
/ (ˈbæləstə) /

noun

any of a set of posts supporting a rail or coping

adjective

(of a shape) swelling at the base and rising in a concave curve to a narrow stem or necka baluster goblet stem

Word Origin for baluster

C17: from French balustre, from Italian balaustro pillar resembling a pomegranate flower, ultimately from Greek balaustion
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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