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baryon

[ bar-ee-on ]
/ ˈbær iˌɒn /
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noun Physics.
a proton, neutron, or any elementary particle that decays into a set of particles that includes a proton.
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Origin of baryon

1950–55; <Greek barý(s) heavy + (fermi)on

OTHER WORDS FROM baryon

bar·y·on·ic [bar-ee-on-ik], /ˌbær iˈɒn ɪk/, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use baryon in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for baryon

baryon
/ (ˈbærɪˌɒn) /

noun
any of a class of elementary particles that have a mass greater than or equal to that of the proton, participate in strong interactions, and have a spin of 1/2 . Baryons are either nucleons or hyperons. The baryon number is the number of baryons in a system minus the number of antibaryons

Word Origin for baryon

C20: bary-, from Greek barus heavy + -on
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for baryon

baryon
[ bărē-ŏn′ ]

Any of a family of subatomic particles composed of three quarks or three antiquarks. They are generally more massive than mesons, and interact with each other via the strong force. Baryons form a subclass of hadrons and are subdivided into nucleons and hyperons. Protons and neutrons are baryons. See Table at subatomic particle.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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