Bauhaus

[bou-hous]
noun
  1. a school of design established in Weimar in 1919 by Walter Gropius, moved to Dessau in 1926, and closed in 1933 as a result of Nazi hostility.
adjective
  1. of or relating to the concepts, ideas, or styles developed at the Bauhaus, characterized chiefly by an emphasis on functional design in architecture and the applied arts.

Origin of Bauhaus

1920–25; < German, equivalent to Bau- build, building + Haus house
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for bauhaus

Contemporary Examples of bauhaus

  • There are very interesting letters between Walter Gropius, head of the Bauhaus, and Alfred Barr, the first director of MoMA.

    The Daily Beast logo
    How Jews Created American Modernism

    Andrew Romano

    August 1, 2014

  • In the 1930s, MoMA did a big show on the Bauhaus, and they worked very hard to say that modernism was a style.

    The Daily Beast logo
    How Jews Created American Modernism

    Andrew Romano

    August 1, 2014


British Dictionary definitions for bauhaus

Bauhaus

noun
    1. a German school of architecture and applied arts founded in 1919 by Walter Gropius on experimental principles of functionalism and truth to materials. After being closed by the Nazis in 1933, its ideas were widely disseminated by its students and staff, including Kandinsky, Klee, Feininger, Moholy-Nagy, and Mies van der Rohe
    2. (as modifier)Bauhaus wallpaper

Word Origin for Bauhaus

C20: German, literally: building house
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for bauhaus

Bauhaus

n.

1923, from German Bauhaus, literally "architecture-house;" school of design founded in Weimar, Germany, 1919 by Walter Gropius (1883-1969), later extended to the principles it embodied. First element is bau "building, construction, structure," from Old High German buan "to dwell" (see bound (adj.2)). For second element, see house (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

bauhaus in Culture

Bauhaus

[(bou-hous)]

A German school of applied arts of the early twentieth century. Its aim was to bring people working in architecture, modern technology, and the decorative arts together to learn from one another. The school developed a style that was spare, functional, and geometric. Bauhaus designs for buildings, chairs, teapots, and many other objects are highly prized today, but when the school was active, it was generally unpopular. The Bauhaus was closed by the Nazis, but its members, including Walter Gropius, spread its teachings throughout the world.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.