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Beaufort scale

[ boh-fert ]
/ ˈboʊ fərt /
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noun (no longer in technical use)
a scale of wind forces, described by name and range of velocity, and classified as from force 0 to force 12, or, sometimes, to force 17.
a scale of the states of sea created by winds of these various forces up to and including force 10.
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Origin of Beaufort scale

1855–60; named after Sir Francis Beaufort (1774–1857), British admiral who devised it
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use Beaufort scale in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for Beaufort scale

Beaufort scale

noun
meteorol an international scale of wind velocities ranging for practical purposes from 0 (calm) to 12 (hurricane force). In the US an extension of the scale, from 13 to 17 for winds over 64 knots, is used

Word Origin for Beaufort scale

C19: after Sir Francis Beaufort (1774–1857), British admiral and hydrographer who devised it
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for Beaufort scale

Beaufort scale
[ bōfərt ]

A scale for classifying the force of the wind, ranging from 0 (calm) to 12 (hurricane). A wind classified as 0 has a velocity of less than 1.6 km (1 mi) per hour; a wind classified as 12 has a velocity of over 119 km (74 mi) per hour. Other categories include light air, five levels of breeze, four levels of gale, and storm. The scale was devised in 1805 as a means of describing the effect of different wind velocities on ships at sea. It is named after an admiral in the British navy, Sir Francis Beaufort (1774-1857).
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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