bellows

[ bel-ohz, -uhz ]
/ ˈbɛl oʊz, -əz /

noun (used with a singular or plural verb)

a device for producing a strong current of air, consisting of a chamber that can be expanded to draw in air through a valve and contracted to expel it through a tube.
anything resembling or suggesting bellows in form, as the collapsible part of a camera or enlarger.
the lungs.

QUIZZES

BEAT THE DOLDRUMS WITH THIS WORD OF THE DAY QUIZ!

We know you’ll tackle this quiz totis viribus! See how many words from the week of Oct 12–18, 2020 you get right!
Question 1 of 7
What does “Indigenous” mean?

Origin of bellows

before 900; Middle English bel(o)wes (plural), Old English belg, short for blǣst belg, plural belgas blast-bag; cognate with Dutch blaasbalg,German Blasebalg,Old Norse belgr.See belly

OTHER WORDS FROM bellows

bel·lows·like, adjective

Definition for bellows (2 of 2)

Bellows
[ bel-ohz ]
/ ˈbɛl oʊz /

noun

George Wesley, 1882–1925, U.S. painter and lithographer.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for bellows

British Dictionary definitions for bellows

bellows
/ (ˈbɛləʊz) /

noun (functioning as singular or plural)

Also called: pair of bellows an instrument consisting of an air chamber with flexible sides or end, a means of compressing it, an inlet valve, and a constricted outlet that is used to create a stream of air, as for producing a draught for a fire or for sounding organ pipes
photog a telescopic light-tight sleeve, connecting the lens system of some cameras to the body of the instrument
a flexible corrugated element used as an expansion joint, pump, or means of transmitting axial motion

Word Origin for bellows

C16: from plural of Old English belig belly
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012