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benedict

[ ben-i-dikt ]
/ ˈbɛn ɪ dɪkt /
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noun
a newly married man, especially one who has been long a bachelor: From the sublime to the ridiculous—the bride in her most seductive lingerie and the benedict in a pair of ratty old boxers.
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Origin of benedict

First recorded in 1820–25; erroneous assimilation of Benedick to a more familiar name

Other definitions for benedict (2 of 2)

Benedict
[ ben-i-dikt ]
/ ˈbɛn ɪ dɪkt /

noun
Ruth (Fulton), 1887–1948, U.S. writer and anthropologist.
Saint, a.d. 480–c543, Italian monk: founded Benedictine order.
Stanley Ros·si·ter [ros-i-ter], /ˈrɒs ɪ tər/, 1884–1936, U.S. biochemist.
a male given name: from a Latin word meaning “blessed.”
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use benedict in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for benedict

Benedict
/ (ˈbɛnɪˌdɪkt) /

noun
Saint . ?480–?547 ad, Italian monk: founded the Benedictine order at Monte Cassino in Italy in about 540 ad . His Regula Monachorum became the basis of the rule of all Western Christian monastic orders. Feast day: July 11 or March 14
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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