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benzene

[ ben-zeen, ben-zeen ]

noun

, Chemistry.
  1. a colorless, volatile, flammable, toxic, slightly water-soluble, liquid, aromatic compound, C 6 H 6 , obtained chiefly from coal tar: used in the manufacture of commercial and medicinal chemicals, dyes, and as a solvent for resins, fats, or the like.


benzene

/ ˈbɛnziːn; bɛnˈziːn /

noun

  1. a colourless flammable toxic aromatic liquid used in the manufacture of styrene, phenol, etc, as a solvent for fats, resins, etc, and as an insecticide. Formula: C 6 H 6 See also benzene ring


benzene

/ bĕnzēn′ /

  1. A colorless flammable liquid derived from petroleum. Benzene is used to make detergents, insecticides, motor fuels, and many other chemical products. Chemical formula: C 6 H 6 .
  2. See more at benzene ring


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Word History and Origins

Origin of benzene1

First recorded in 1825–35; benz(oic acid) + -ene
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Example Sentences

It contains hazardous air pollutants like nitrogen oxides, particulate matter, and benzene, which all contribute to unhealthy air that more than 41 percent of Americans breathe in.

From Vox

To pay for those instances, the new infrastructure bill revives a tax on imported toxic chemicals and metals, like benzene, chlorine, and cobalt.

From the 19th-century chemist Friedrich August Kekulé’s discovery of the structure of benzene to any of Mozart’s symphonies, much extraordinary human achievement is not a product of conscious, sequential reasoning.

A recent major breakthrough was a tabletop device that could operate on sunlight alone for more than 3,000 hours without degradation, converting methane into benzene and reducing nitrogen into ammonia, an important element for fertilizer.

From Ozy

Exposure to benzene at very high levels can cause difficulty thinking, change in heart function and it’s considered a cancer-causing chemical.

Benzene causes cancer, thins the blood to cause symptoms resembling hemophilia, and damages fetuses exposed to it.

Benzene makes people sick, shortens lives, and harms future generations.

Butane purchased at a hardware store often contains chemicals like benzene, which is known to cause cancer.

However studies have found dangerous compounds like benzene and formaldehyde in inhaled or secondhand vapor.

A solution of hydrogen chloride in a poorly ionizing medium, like benzene or toluene, is an extremely poor conductor.

Petroleum boiling between 160 and 195 F. dissolves less than benzene.

To undertake anything big was out of the question, so we dropped thirty-two gallons of benzene and a spare propeller.

Another mile went by and we came to snow, where forty gallons of benzene, twelve gallons of oil and a sledge were abandoned.

The hydrocarbons consist largely of benzene, which requires three times as much air for complete combustion as acetylene does.

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