bleat

[ bleet ]
/ blit /

verb (used without object)

to utter the cry of a sheep, goat, or calf or a sound resembling such a cry.

verb (used with object)

to give forth with or as if with a bleat: He bleated his objections in a helpless rage.
to babble; prate.

noun

the cry of a sheep, goat, or calf.
any similar sound: the bleat of distant horns.
foolish, complaining talk; babble: I listened to their inane bleat all evening.

RELATED WORDS


Nearby words

  1. blear,
  2. blearedness,
  3. bleary,
  4. bleary-eyed,
  5. bleasdale,
  6. bleaunt,
  7. bleb,
  8. bled,
  9. bledisloe cup,
  10. bleed

Origin of bleat

before 1000; Middle English bleten, Old English blǣtan; cognate with Dutch blaten, Old High German blāzen; akin to Latin flēre to weep

Related formsbleat·er, nounbleat·ing·ly, adverbout·bleat, verb (used with object)

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for bleat


British Dictionary definitions for bleat

bleat

/ (bliːt) /

verb

(intr) (of a sheep, goat, or calf) to utter its characteristic plaintive cry
(intr) to speak with any similar sound
to whine; whimper

noun

the characteristic cry of sheep, goats, and young calves
any sound similar to this
a weak complaint or whine
Derived Formsbleater, nounbleating, noun, adjective

Word Origin for bleat

Old English blǣtan; related to Old High German blāzen, Dutch blaten, Latin flēre to weep; see blare

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for bleat
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper