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View synonyms for blind spot

blind spot

[ blahynd spot ]

noun

  1. Anatomy. a small area on the retina that is insensitive to light due to the interruption, where the optic nerve joins the retina, of the normal pattern of light-sensitive rods and cones.
  2. an area or subject about which one is uninformed, prejudiced, or unappreciative:

    I confess that operettas are my blind spot.

  3. Also called dead spot. any part of an auditorium, arena, or the like, in which a person is unable to see or hear satisfactorily.
  4. an area to the side and slightly behind a driver's field of vision that is not reflected in the vehicle's rearview mirror.


blind spot

noun

  1. a small oval-shaped area of the retina in which vision is not experienced. It marks the nonphotosensitive site of entrance into the eyeball of the optic nerve See optic disc
  2. a place or area, as in an auditorium or part of a road, where vision is completely or partially obscured or hearing is difficult or impossible
  3. a subject about which a person is ignorant or prejudiced, or an occupation in which he or she is inefficient
  4. a location within the normal range of a radio transmitter with weak reception


blind spot

/ blīnd /

  1. The small region of the retina where fibers of the optic nerve emerge from the eyeball. The blind spot has no rods or cones, so no light or visual image can be transmitted.


blind spot

  1. A small region in the visual field (the area scanned by the eye ) that cannot be seen. The blind spot corresponds to an area in the eye where the optic nerve enters the retina .


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Notes

In a general sense, the term is used to refer to an inability to see things that might be obvious to another observer: “He has a blind spot as far as his daughter's behavior is concerned.”
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Word History and Origins

Origin of blind spot1

First recorded in 1860–65
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Idioms and Phrases

Subject about which one is ignorant or biased. For example, The boss has a blind spot about Henry; he wouldn't fire him for anything , or Dad has a blind spot about opera; he can't see anything good about it . This term uses blind in the sense of “covered or hidden from sight.” It has two literal meanings: an insensitive part of the retina and an area outside one's field of vision. The phrase has largely replaced blind side , which survives mainly in the verb to blindside , meaning “to hit someone on an unguarded side” and “to deal an unexpected blow.” [Mid-1800s]
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Example Sentences

“It was clear that though Ed was this powerful character, he had a blind spot where women were concerned,” Kerzner said.

And when it comes to holidays - see Will and Kate's latest trip to the Maldives - the young royals have a total blind spot.

The thing that made me the most anxious, weirdly, was the interaction that Patrick had socially, where he had that blind spot on.

But when it comes to women, this pope, like past popes, has a blind spot.

Everybody knows what the blind spot is, and every psychology and physiology text-book talks about it.

The size of the blind spot is large enough to cover in the heavens a plate which has twelve times the diameter of the moon.

My fault—blind spot of apperception—human failure in engineering—as fifth columns entered nerve path filler spouts.

Meanwhile you are getting understandably impatient to explore that unknown realm of the Blind Spot.

It is an unfortunate case; but there is much to be learned in the circumstance that led the great doctor into the Blind Spot.

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Definitions and idiom definitions from Dictionary.com Unabridged, based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

Idioms from The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

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