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blindfold

[ blahynd-fohld ]
/ ˈblaɪndˌfoʊld /
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verb (used with object)
to prevent or occlude sight by covering (the eyes) with a cloth, bandage, or the like; cover the eyes of.
to impair the awareness or clear thinking of: Don't let their hospitality blindfold you to the true purpose of their invitation.
noun
a cloth or bandage put before the eyes to prevent seeing.
adjective
with the eyes covered: a blindfold test.
rash; unthinking: a blindfold denunciation before knowing the facts.
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Origin of blindfold

1520–30; alteration, by association with fold1, of blindfell to cover the eyes, strike blind, Middle English blindfellen;see blind, fell2

OTHER WORDS FROM blindfold

un·blind·fold·ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use blindfold in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for blindfold

blindfold
/ (ˈblaɪndˌfəʊld) /

verb (tr)
to prevent (a person or animal) from seeing by covering (the eyes)
to prevent from perceiving or understanding
noun
a piece of cloth, bandage, etc, used to cover the eyes
any interference to sight
adjective, adverb

Word Origin for blindfold

changed (C16) through association with fold 1 from Old English blindfellian to strike blind; see blind, fell ²
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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