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blizzard

[ bliz-erd ]
/ ˈblɪz ərd /
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noun

Meteorology.
  1. a storm, technically an extratropical cyclone, with dry, driving snow, strong winds, and intense cold.
  2. a heavy and prolonged snowstorm covering a wide area.
an inordinately large amount all at one time: a blizzard of Christmas cards.

verb (used without object)

to snow as a blizzard: Looks as though it's going to blizzard tonight.

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Origin of blizzard

An Americanism first recorded in 1820–30 for earlier meaning “violent blow, shot”; compare British dialectal (Midlands) blizzer, blizzom “blaze, flash, anything that blinds momentarily”; probably expressive formations with components of blast, blaze1, bluster, etc.

OTHER WORDS FROM blizzard

bliz·zard·y, bliz·zard·ly, adjective

Words nearby blizzard

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use blizzard in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for blizzard

blizzard
/ (ˈblɪzəd) /

noun

a strong bitterly cold wind accompanied by a widespread heavy snowfall

Word Origin for blizzard

C19: of uncertain origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for blizzard

blizzard
[ blĭzərd ]

A violent snowstorm with winds blowing at a minimum speed of 56 km (35 mi) per hour and visibility of less 400 m (0.25 mi) for three hours.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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