blowing

[ bloh-ing ]
/ ˈbloʊ ɪŋ /

noun

the sound of any vapor or gas issuing from a vent under pressure.
Metallurgy. a disturbance caused by gas or steam blowing through molten metal.
Also called blow molding. a method of producing hollowware by injecting air under pressure into a molten mass, as of glass or plastic, and shaping the material within a mold.

Origin of blowing

before 1000; Middle English, Old English; see blow2, -ing1

Definition for blowing (2 of 3)

Origin of blow

2
before 1000; Middle English blowen (v.), Old English blāwan; cognate with Latin flāre to blow

Definition for blowing (3 of 3)

blow

3
[ bloh ]
/ bloʊ /

noun

a yield or display of blossoms: the lilac's lavender blows.
a display of anything bright or brilliant: a rich, full blow of color.
state of blossoming; a flowering: a border of tulips in full blow.

verb (used with or without object), blew, blown, blow·ing.

Archaic. to blossom or cause to blossom.

Origin of blow

3
before 1000; Middle English blowen (v.), Old English blōwan; akin to German blühen to bloom, Latin flōs flower
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for blowing

British Dictionary definitions for blowing (1 of 3)

blow

1
/ (bləʊ) /

verb blows, blowing, blew or blown

noun

Word Origin for blow

Old English blāwan, related to Old Norse blǣr gust of wind, Old High German blāen, Latin flāre

British Dictionary definitions for blowing (2 of 3)

blow

2
/ (bləʊ) /

noun

a powerful or heavy stroke with the fist, a weapon, etc
at one blow or at a blow by or with only one action; all at one time
a sudden setback; unfortunate eventto come as a blow
come to blows
  1. to fight
  2. to result in a fight
an attacking actiona blow for freedom
Australian and NZ a stroke of the shears in sheep-shearing

Word Origin for blow

C15: probably of Germanic origin; compare Old High German bliuwan to beat

British Dictionary definitions for blowing (3 of 3)

blow

3
/ (bləʊ) /

verb blows, blowing, blew or blown

(intr) (of a plant or flower) to blossom or open out
(tr) to produce (flowers)

noun

a mass of blossoms
the state or period of blossoming (esp in the phrase in full blow)

Word Origin for blow

Old English blōwan; related to Old Frisian blōia to bloom, Old High German bluoen, Latin flōs flower; see bloom 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with blowing

blow


In addition to the idioms beginning with blow

  • blow a fuse
  • blow away
  • blow by blow
  • blow hot and cold
  • blow in
  • blow it
  • blow off
  • blow off steam
  • blow one's brains out
  • blow one's cool
  • blow one's cover
  • blow one's mind
  • blow one's own horn
  • blow one's top
  • blow out
  • blow over
  • blow sky-high
  • blow someone to
  • blow the lid off
  • blow the whistle on
  • blow up

also see:

  • at one stroke (blow)
  • body blow
  • come to blows
  • keep (blow) one's cool
  • low blow
  • way the wind blows
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.