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Bragg

[ brag ]
/ bræg /
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noun

Brax·ton [brak-stuhn], /ˈbræk stən/, 1817–76, Confederate general in the U.S. Civil War.
Sir William Henry, 1862–1942, and his son, Sir William Lawrence, 1890–1971, English physicists: Nobel Prize winners 1915.

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Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

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British Dictionary definitions for Bragg

Bragg
/ (bræɡ) /

noun

Billy. born 1957, British rock singer and songwriter, noted for his political protest songs; recordings include Between the Wars (1985), Workers' Playtime (1988), Mermaid Avenue (1998), and England, Half English (2002)
Melvyn, Baron. born 1939, British novelist, broadcaster, and television executive; presenter of The South Bank Show since 1978
Sir William Henry , 1862–1942, British physicist, who shared a Nobel prize for physics (1915) with his son, for their study of crystal structures by means of X-rays
his son, Sir (William) Lawrence, 1890–1971, British physicist
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for Bragg

Bragg
[ brăg ]
Sir William Henry 1862-1942

British physicist who invented the x-ray spectrometer, a device used to measure x-ray wavelengths. With his son, the physicist Sir William Lawrence Bragg (1890-1971), he developed the technique of x-ray crystallography, used to determine the atomic structure of crystals. Father and son were awarded a joint Nobel Prize for physics in 1915 for this work.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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