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brattice

[ brat-is ]
/ ˈbræt ɪs /
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noun
a partition or lining, as of planks or cloth, forming an air passage in a mine.
(in medieval architecture) any temporary wooden fortification, especially at the top of a wall.
verb (used with object), brat·ticed, brat·tic·ing.
to provide with a brattice (often followed by up).
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Origin of brattice

First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English brutaske, bretage, bretice, from Anglo-French bretaske, bretage, Anglo-French, Old French bretesche “wooden parapet on a fortress,” from Medieval Latin (9th century) brittisca, apparently a Latinized form of Old English Bryttisc “British” (or a new formation in Medieval Latin ), on the presumption that such parapets were introduced from Britain; see British
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How to use brattice in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for brattice

brattice
/ (ˈbrætɪs) /

noun
a partition of wood or treated cloth used to control ventilation in a mine
medieval fortifications a fixed wooden tower or parapet
verb
(tr) mining to fit with a brattice

Word Origin for brattice

C13: from Old French bretesche wooden tower, from Medieval Latin breteschia, probably from Latin Britō a Briton
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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