breakout

[ breyk-out ]
/ ˈbreɪkˌaʊt /

noun

an escape, often with the use of force, as from a prison or mental institution.
an appearance or manifestation, as of a disease, that is sudden and often widespread; outbreak.
an itemization; breakdown: a hotel bill with a breakout of each service offered.
an instance of surpassing any previous achievement: a breakout in gold prices.
the act or process of removing and disassembling equipment that has been used in drilling a well.

adjective

of or constituting a sudden increase, advance, or unexpected success: The director has finally scored with a breakout movie.

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Origin of breakout

First recorded in 1810–20; noun use of verb phrase break out
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for breakout

British Dictionary definitions for breakout

break out

verb

noun break-out

an escape, esp from prison or confinement
  1. a great success, esp following relatively disappointing performance
  2. (as modifier)a breakout year
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with breakout

break out

1

Develop suddenly and forcefully. For example, A fire broke out last night, or He broke out in a sweat. [a.d. 1000]

2

Be affected with a skin eruption, such as a rash or boils, as in A teenager's face often breaks out in pimples. [c. 1300]

3

Prepare something for consumption, action, or use, as in Let's break out the champagne, or It's such a fine day—let's break out the fishing rods. [Early 1800s]

4

break out of. Force out by breaking; also, escape from confinement. For example, The hurricane broke the glass out of all the windows, or He broke out of prison but was soon apprehended. [Early 1600s]

5

Isolate a portion of a body of data, as in Please break out the sales figures from the quarterly report. [Mid-1900s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.