breakup

[ breyk-uhp ]
/ ˈbreɪkˌʌp /

noun

disintegration; disruption; dispersal.
the ending of a personal, especially a romantic, relationship.
(in Alaska and Canada)
  1. the melting and loosening of ice in rivers and harbors during the early spring.
  2. the first day on which such ice is soft or dispersed enough to permit ships to use the waterways.
Informal. an act or instance of being convulsed with laughter.
temporary distortion in a televised picture.

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Origin of breakup

First recorded in 1785–95; noun use of verb phrase break up
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for breakup

British Dictionary definitions for breakup

break up

verb (adverb)

noun break-up

a separation or disintegration
Canadian
  1. in the Canadian north, the breaking up of the ice on a body of water that marks the beginning of spring
  2. this season
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with breakup

break up

1

Divide into many pieces; disintegrate. For example, Now break up the head of garlic into separate cloves. [Mid-1700s]

2

Interrupt the continuity of something, as in A short walk will break up the long morning.

3

Also, break it up. Scatter, disperse, as in The crowd broke up as soon as they reached the streets. [Late 1400s] This phrase is also used as an imperative, as in “Break it up!” shouted the police officer. [c. 1930]

4

Bring or come to an end, as in His gambling was bound to break up their marriage.

5

Also, break someone up. Burst into or cause one to burst into an expression of feeling, such as laughter or tears. For example, His jokes always break me up, or That touching eulogy broke us all up, or I looked at her and just broke up. The precise meaning depends on the context. This sense grew out of a usage from the early 1800s that meant “upset” or “disturb.” [Colloquial; early 1800s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.