bring out


verb (tr, adverb)

to produce or publish or have publishedwhen are you bringing out a new dictionary?
to expose, reveal, or cause to be seenshe brought out the best in me
to encourage (a shy person) to be less reserved (often in the phrase bring (someone) out of himself or herself)
British (of a trade union, provocative action by management, misunderstanding, etc) to cause (workers) to strike
(foll by in) to cause (a person) to become covered (with spots, a rash, etc)
British to introduce (a girl) formally into society as a debutante

QUIZZES

WHO SAID IT: A QUIZ ON PRESIDENTIAL WIT AND WISDOM

Think you know your presidents? Take this quiz and see if you can match the style, wit, and ideology of these memorable lines to the right POTUS.
Question 1 of 9
“I do believe that the buck stops here, that I cannot rely upon public opinion polls to tell me what is right. I do believe that right makes might and that if I am wrong, 10 angels swearing I was right would make no difference.”
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with bring out

bring out

1

Expose or reveal; make conspicuous. For example, His book brought out some new facts about the war, or Her photographs bring out the play of light on her subjects. [Late 1500s]

2

Nurture or develop a quality, as in A gifted teacher brings out the best in pupils. [c. 1700]

3

Present to the public. For example, The publisher decided to bring out this dictionary in a single volume, or Debutantes traditionally are brought out at a ball. [c. 1800]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.