term

[ turm ]
/ tɜrm /

noun

verb (used with object)

to apply a particular term or name to; name; call; designate.

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Idioms for term

Origin of term

1175–1225; Middle English terme < Old French < Latin terminus boundary, limit, end; akin to Greek térmōn limit

OTHER WORDS FROM term

term·ly, adverbhalf-term, nounin·ter·term, adjectivemis·term, verb (used with object)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for bring to terms

term
/ (tɜːm) /

noun

verb

(tr) to designate; callhe was termed a thief
See also terms

Derived forms of term

termly, adverb

Word Origin for term

C13: from Old French terme, from Latin terminus end
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for bring to terms

term
[ tûrm ]

n.

A limited period of time.
The end of a normal gestation period.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Scientific definitions for bring to terms

term
[ tûrm ]

Each of the quantities or expressions that form the parts of a ratio or the numerator and denominator of a fraction.
Any of the quantities in an equation that are connected to other quantities by a plus sign or a minus sign.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with bring to terms

bring to terms

Force someone to agree or continue negotiations, as in The creditors were determined to bring the company to terms. The terms here mean “the conditions for agreement.” [First half of 1700s] Also see come to terms.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.