Origin of broadcast

1760–70; orig., broad (adv.) + cast, past participle of cast
Related formsun·broad·cast·ed, adjective
Can be confusedbroadcast narrowcast simulcast
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

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Contemporary Examples of broadcasted

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British Dictionary definitions for broadcasted

broadcast

verb -casts, -casting, -cast or -casted

to transmit (announcements or programmes) on radio or television
(intr) to take part in a radio or television programme
(tr) to make widely known throughout an areato broadcast news
(tr) to scatter (seed, etc) over an area, esp by hand

noun

  1. a transmission or programme on radio or television
  2. (as modifier)a broadcast signal
  1. the act of scattering seeds
  2. (as modifier)the broadcast method of sowing

adjective

dispersed over a wide areabroadcast seeds

adverb

far and wideseeds to be sown broadcast
Derived Formsbroadcaster, nounbroadcasting, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for broadcasted

broadcast

1767, adjective, in reference to the spreading of seed, from broad (adj.) + past participle of cast (v.). Figurative use is recorded from 1785. Modern media use began with radio (1922, adjective and noun). As a verb, recorded from 1813 in an agricultural sense, 1829 in a figurative sense, 1921 in reference to radio.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper