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View synonyms for brusque

brusque

or brusk

[ bruhsk; especially British broosk ]

adjective

  1. abrupt in manner; blunt; rough:

    A brusque welcome greeted his unexpected return.

    Synonyms: curt, short, unceremonious



brusque

/ bruːsk; ˈbruːskərɪ; brʊsk /

adjective

  1. blunt or curt in manner or speech


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Derived Forms

  • ˈbrusqueness, noun
  • ˈbrusquely, adverb

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Other Words From

  • brusque·ly adverb
  • brusque·ness noun

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Word History and Origins

Origin of brusque1

First recorded in 1595–1605; from Middle French, from Italian brusco “rough, tart,” special use of brusco (noun) “butcher's broom,” from Late Latin brūscum, for Latin rūscus, rūscum, perhaps conflated with unattested Vulgar Latin brūcus “heather” ( brier 2 )

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Word History and Origins

Origin of brusque1

C17: from French, from Italian brusco sour, rough, from Medieval Latin bruscus butcher's broom

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Synonym Study

See blunt.

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Example Sentences

I wanted his calming presence when the doctor came in, brusque and aloof, and I tried to remember all the questions that kept me up at night.

From Time

It wasn’t easy to watch, especially because he seems to have a naturally brusque demeanor, which isn’t softened when the ever-present mask hides his wide smile.

Sifton writes in the brusque but encouraging tone of a neighborhood dad coaching a soccer game.

From Eater

They described him as an alpha male, brusque, sometimes rude — even to the queen — but one who worked hard to support her and give a modern gloss to the 1,000-year-old institution of the English monarchy.

The fact that he’s still in office is a testament to his brusque determination and general unconcern for the opinions of others.

He identifies as “brusque” like other New York City residents.

Those who have interacted with him describe him as brusque, eccentric, clenched.

And McCauley was surely friendlier that his brusque air of command indicated.

Whatever shortcomings the sometimes brusque Abramson has as a manager, she just led the paper to four Pulitzers.

She is frequently described in the press with such adjectives as “brusque,” “aggressive,” and “undiplomatic in the extreme.”

"I thought you wouldn't like the bed," she said, with the brusque familiarity of an old servant and friend.

She assumed, however, a tone almost brusque, artificially airy and unimportant.

The brusque and rather timid young officer is lionized in the drawing-room of Madame Tallien.

He spoke in brusque tones, and he looked at Mina as if he did not know what she might be doing there.

In most cases he is deplorably curt of speech and brusque of deportment.

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brushybrusquely