Origin of buckle

1300–50; Middle English bocle < Anglo-French bo(u)cle, bucle < Latin buc(c)ula cheekpiece (of a helmet), strip of wood, etc., resembling a cheekpiece, equivalent to bucc(a) cheek + -ula -ule
Related formsbuck·le·less, adjectivere·buck·le, verb, re·buck·led, re·buck·ling.

Synonyms for buckle

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for buckle

Contemporary Examples of buckle

Historical Examples of buckle

  • The scene follows in which she plays squire to Antony and helps to buckle on his armour.

  • "Perhaps I could help you with that buckle, Miss," she suggested, approaching.

    Alice Adams

    Booth Tarkington

  • Fling this over my shoulder, and buckle it behind, will you?'

    Barnaby Rudge

    Charles Dickens

  • Fascination was alike in her smile, and her sash, her bow, and her buckle.

    Vivian Grey

    Earl of Beaconsfield, Benjamin Disraeli

  • I should say that the lower chord here might buckle at any moment.

    Alexander's Bridge and The Barrel Organ

    Willa Cather and Alfred Noyes


British Dictionary definitions for buckle

buckle

noun

a clasp for fastening together two loose ends, esp of a belt or strap, usually consisting of a frame with an attached movable prong
an ornamental representation of a buckle, as on a shoe
a kink, bulge, or other distortiona buckle in a railway track

verb

to fasten or be fastened with a buckle
to bend or cause to bend out of shape, esp as a result of pressure or heat

Word Origin for buckle

C14: from Old French bocle, from Latin buccula a little cheek, hence, cheek strap of a helmet, from bucca cheek
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for buckle
n.

"spiked metal ring for holding a belt, etc., c.1300, bukel, from Old French bocle "boss (of a shield)," then "shield," then by further extension "buckle, metal ring," (12c., Modern French boucle), from Latin buccula "cheek strap of a helmet," in Late Latin "boss of a shield," diminutive of bucca "cheek" (see bouche).

Boucle in the middle ages had the double sense of a "shield's boss" and "a ring"; the last sense has alone survived, and it metaph. developed in the boucle de cheveux, ringlets. [Kitchin]
v.2

"distort, warp, bend out of shape" 1520s, bokelen "to arch the body," from Middle French boucler "to bulge," from Old French bocler "to bulge," from bocle "boss of a shield" (see buckle (n.)). Meaning "bend under strong pressure" is from 1590s (figurative from 1640s) . Related: Buckled; buckling.

v.1

late 14c., bokelen, "to fasten with a buckle," from buckle (n.). Related: Buckled; buckling. To buckle down "apply effort, settle down," (1874) is said to be a variant of knuckle down (see knuckle).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper