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bugger

1
[ buhg-er, boog- ]
/ ˈbʌg ər, ˈbʊg- /
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noun
verb (used with object)
Verb Phrases
bugger off, Chiefly British Slang. to depart; bug off.
bugger up, Chiefly British Slang. to ruin; spoil; botch.
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Origin of bugger

1
First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English bougre, from Anglo-French bugre, from Medieval Latin Bulgarus “heretic,” literally, “Bulgarian,” by association of the Balkans with heretical sects such as the Bogomils and their alleged deviant sexual practices; def. 1 perhaps by reanalysis as bug1 or bug2 + -er1 (cf. booger)

Other definitions for bugger (2 of 2)

bugger2
[ buhg-er ]
/ ˈbʌg ər /

a person who installs a hidden listening device.

Origin of bugger

2
First recorded in 1965–70; bug1 + -er1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

British Dictionary definitions for bugger

bugger
/ (ˈbʌɡə) /

noun
verb
interjection
slang an exclamation of annoyance or disappointment

Word Origin for bugger

C16: from Old French bougre, from Medieval Latin Bulgarus Bulgarian; from the condemnation of the dualist heresy rife in Bulgaria from the tenth century to the fifteenth
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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