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View synonyms for bullion

bullion

[ bool-yuhn ]

noun

  1. gold or silver considered in mass rather than in value.
  2. gold or silver in the form of bars or ingots.
  3. Also called bullion fringe. a thick trimming of cord covered with gold or silver thread, for decorating uniforms.
  4. embroidery or lace worked with gold wire or gold or silver cords.


bullion

/ ˈbʊljən /

noun

  1. gold or silver in mass
  2. gold or silver in the form of bars and ingots, suitable for further processing
  3. Also calledbullion fringe a thick gold or silver wire or fringed cord used as a trimming, as on military uniforms


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Other Words From

  • bul·lion·less adjective

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Word History and Origins

Origin of bullion1

1300–50; Middle English: melted mass of gold or silver < Anglo-Latin bulliōn- (stem of bulliō ) in same sense (< Anglo-French bullion mint), literally, a boiling, equivalent to bull ( īre ) to bubble, boil 1 + -iōn- -ion

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Word History and Origins

Origin of bullion1

C14 (in the sense: melted gold or silver): from Anglo-French: mint, probably from Old French bouillir to boil, from Latin bullīre

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Example Sentences

The company has also created digital tokens for gold that are tied to actual bars of bullion held in a London bank.

From Fortune

Bullion prices have grown nearly 40 percent in the past year.

From Ozy

The blank right-hand panel could be mirror as well as bullion.

Warhol's "Crash" may have started out depicting hoarded bullion, but last night that's what it became.

Nor do they expect other people to believe this, sparking a hysteria that could make the fortunes of those with bullion.

Then small bullion tassels to match the twist will form a suitable and elegant finish.

For some years the subject attracted little attention, until the bullion committee of 1810 propounded a sounder theory.

Gold was considered bullion in Palestine for a long time after silver was current as money.

He 'sophisticated' it, as the parliamentary documents call it—that is, he used base metal instead of bullion.

"You'd have to be protected; you'd be Bullion on two legs," said Algernon, always shrewd in detecting a weakness.

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bull in a china shopbullionist