bung

1
[ buhng ]
/ bʌŋ /

noun

a stopper for the opening of a cask.

verb (used with object)

to close with or as if with a bung; cork; plug (often followed by up).

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Origin of bung

1
1400–50; late Middle English bunge < Middle Dutch bonge stopper

Definition for bung up (2 of 2)

bung3
[ buhng ]
/ bʌŋ /

verb (used with object)

to beat; bruise; maul (often followed by up).
British Slang. to throw or shove carelessly or violently; sling.

Origin of bung

3
1815–25; orig. Scots variant of bang1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for bung up (1 of 3)

bung1
/ (bʌŋ) /

noun

a stopper, esp of cork or rubber, for a cask, piece of laboratory glassware, etc
short for bunghole

verb (tr)

(often foll by up) to close or seal with or as with a bungthe car's exhaust was bunged up with mud
British and Australian slang to throw; sling

Word Origin for bung

C15: from Middle Dutch bonghe, from Late Latin puncta puncture

British Dictionary definitions for bung up (2 of 3)

bung2
/ (bʌŋ) British slang /

noun

a gratuity; tip
a bribe

verb

bung it on (tr) to behave in a pretentious manner

Word Origin for bung

C16 (originally in the sense: a purse): perhaps from Old English pung, changed over time through the influence of bung 1

British Dictionary definitions for bung up (3 of 3)

bung3
/ (bʌŋ) /

adjective Australian and NZ informal

useless
go bung
  1. to fail or collapse
  2. to die

Word Origin for bung

C19: from a native Australian language
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012