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burnout

[ burn-out ]
/ ˈbɜrnˌaʊt /
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noun
a fire that is totally destructive of something.
Also burn-out . fatigue, frustration, or apathy resulting from prolonged stress, overwork, or intense activity.
Rocketry.
  1. the termination of effective combustion in a rocket engine, due to exhaustion of propellant.
  2. the end of the powered portion of a rocket's flight.
Electricity. the breakdown of a lamp, motor, or other electrical device due to the heat created by the current flowing through it.
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Origin of burnout

First recorded in 1900–05; noun use of verb phrase burn out
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use burnout in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for burnout

burn out

verb (adverb)
to become or cause to become worn out or inoperative as a result of heat or frictionthe clutch burnt out
(intr) (of a rocket, jet engine, etc) to cease functioning as a result of exhaustion of the fuel supply
(tr; usually passive) to destroy by fire
to become or cause to become exhausted through overwork or dissipation
noun burnout
the failure of a mechanical device from excessive heating
a total loss of energy and interest and an inability to function effectively, experienced as a result of excessive demands upon one's resources or chronic overwork
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with burnout

burn out

1

Stop functioning because something, such as fuel, has been used up. For example, There's nothing wrong with the lamp; the light bulb just burned out. [Late 1300s]

2

be burned out. Lose one's home, place of work, or school as the result of a fire. For example, Hundreds of tenants are burned out every year because of negligent landlords.

3

Also, burn oneself out. Make or become exhausted or disaffected, especially with one's work or schooling. For example, Many young lawyers burn themselves out after a few years of 70-hour weeks. This metaphoric term alludes to a fire going out for lack of new fuel. Robert Southey used it in an 1816 essay: “The spirit of Jacobinism was burnt out in France.” [1970s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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