Idioms for bust

Origin of bust

2
1755–65; variant of burst, by loss of r before s, as in ass2, bass2, passel, etc.

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH bust

burst burst (see usage note at the current entry)

usage note for bust

Historically bust is derived from a dialect pronunciation of burst and is related to it much as cuss is related to curse. Bust is both a noun and a verb and has a wide range of meanings for both uses. Many are slang or informal. A few, as “a decline in economic conditions, depression,” are standard.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Examples from the Web for busted

British Dictionary definitions for busted (1 of 3)

busted
/ (ˈbʌstəd) /

adjective

informal caught out doing something wrong and therefore in troubleyou are so busted

British Dictionary definitions for busted (2 of 3)

bust1
/ (bʌst) /

noun

the chest of a human being, esp a woman's bosom
a sculpture of the head, shoulders, and upper chest of a person

Word Origin for bust

C17: from French buste, from Italian busto a sculpture, of unknown origin

British Dictionary definitions for busted (3 of 3)

bust2
/ (bʌst) informal /

verb busts, busting, busted or bust

noun

adjective

Word Origin for bust

C19: from a dialect pronunciation of burst
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with busted

bust

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.