buttery

1
[ buht-uh-ree ]
/ ˈbʌt ə ri /

adjective

like, containing, or spread with butter.
resembling butter, as in smoothness or softness of texture: a vest of buttery leather.
grossly flattering; smarmy.

Origin of buttery

1
First recorded in 1350–1400, buttery is from the Middle English word buttry. See butter, -y1
Related formsbut·ter·i·ness, noun

Definition for buttery (2 of 2)

buttery

2
[ buht-uh-ree, buh-tree ]
/ ˈbʌt ə ri, ˈbʌ tri /

noun, plural but·ter·ies.

Chiefly New England. a room or rooms in which the provisions, wines, and liquors of a household are kept; pantry; larder.
a room in colleges, especially at Oxford and Cambridge universities, from which articles of food and drink are sold or dispensed to the students.

Origin of buttery

2
1350–1400; Middle English boterie < Anglo-French, probably equivalent to bote butt4 + -erie -ery
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for buttery

British Dictionary definitions for buttery (1 of 2)

buttery

1
/ (ˈbʌtərɪ) /

adjective

containing, like, or coated with butter
informal grossly or insincerely flattering; obsequious
Derived Formsbutteriness, noun

British Dictionary definitions for buttery (2 of 2)

buttery

2
/ (ˈbʌtərɪ) /

noun plural -teries

a room for storing foods or wines
British (in some universities) a room in which food is supplied or sold to students

Word Origin for buttery

C14: from Anglo-French boterie, from Anglo-Latin buteria, probably from butta cask, butt 4
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012