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RELATED WORDS

lubricate, bribe, influence, tamper

Nearby words

buxom, buxomly, buxtehude, buxtehude, dietrich, buxton, buy, buy a pig in a poke, buy boat, buy in, buy into, buy it

Idioms

    buy it, Slang. to get killed: He bought it at Dunkirk.

Origin of buy

before 1000; Middle English byen, variant of byggen, buggen, Old English bycgan; cognate with Old Saxon buggjan, Gothic bugjan to buy, Old Norse byggja to lend, rent
ANTONYMS FOR buy
1 sell.
Related forms
Can be confusedbuy by bye

Synonym study

1. Buy, purchase imply obtaining or acquiring property or goods for a price. Buy is the common and informal word, applying to any such transaction: to buy a house, vegetables at the market. Purchase is more formal and may connote buying on a larger scale, in a finer store, and the like: to purchase a year's supplies.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for buy off (1 of 2)

buy off


verb

(tr, adverb) to pay (a person or group) to drop a charge, end opposition, relinquish a claim, etc

British Dictionary definitions for buy off (2 of 2)

buy

/ (baɪ) /

verb buys, buying or bought (mainly tr)

noun

a purchase (often in the phrases good or bad buy)

Word Origin for buy

Old English bycgan; related to Old Norse byggja to let out, lend, Gothic bugjan to buy

usage

The use of off after buy as in I bought this off my neighbour was formerly considered incorrect, but is now acceptable in informal contexts
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with buy off

buy off


Pay to get rid of a claim or opposition, or to avoid prosecution, as in He was caught trying to buy off the opposing candidate. [First half of 1600s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.