Byzantine

[biz-uh n-teen, -tahyn, bahy-zuh n-, bih-zan-tin]

adjective

noun

a native or inhabitant of Byzantium.

Origin of Byzantine

1590–1600; < Late Latin Bȳzantīnus of Byzantium; see -ine1
Related formspre-Byz·an·tine, adjective
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British Dictionary definitions for byzantine

Byzantine

adjective

of, characteristic of, or relating to Byzantium or the Byzantine Empire
of, relating to, or characterizing the Orthodox Church or its rites and liturgy
of or relating to the highly coloured stylized form of religious art developed in the Byzantine Empire
of or relating to the style of architecture developed in the Byzantine Empire, characterized by massive domes with square bases, rounded arches, spires and minarets, and the extensive use of mosaics
denoting the Medieval Greek spoken in the Byzantine Empire
(of attitudes, etc) inflexible or complicated

noun

an inhabitant of Byzantium
Derived FormsByzantinism (bɪˈzæntaɪˌnɪzəm, -tiː, baɪ-, ˈbɪzəntiːˌnɪzəm, -taɪ-), noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for byzantine

Byzantine

adj.

1770, from Latin Byzantinus (see Byzantium); originally used of art style; later in reference to the complex, devious, and intriguing character of the royal court of Constantinople (1937). As a noun from 1770.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper