Cadbury

[ kad-ber-ee, -buh-ree ]

noun
  1. a Neolithic and Iron Age site in Somerset, England, traditionally the Camelot of King Arthur.

Words Nearby Cadbury

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2024

How to use Cadbury in a sentence

  • So, Kraft just sold its highly profitable frozen pizza brands to Nestlé for $3.7 billion cash to toss onto the Cadbury pile.

    How Boards Are Destroying Corporations | David Zweig, John Gillespie | January 13, 2010 | THE DAILY BEAST
  • The college living of North Cadbury, in Somerset, was presented to him in 1643, and shortly afterwards he married.

    Bygone Beliefs | H. Stanley Redgrove
  • An interesting excursion may be made to Cadbury Castle, five miles north of Sherborne.

    Wanderings in Wessex | Edric Holmes
  • Cadbury, it seems, was occupied mainly in the Celtic period, before the Roman conquest.

    Roman Britain in 1914 | F. Haverfield
  • Then Cadbury thumped him on the back, and Hallett and Bacon fairly forced him to his feet.

    Jack of Both Sides | Florence Coombe
  • "Suicide while temporarily insane," put in Cadbury, covering his mouth with his hand.

    Jack of Both Sides | Florence Coombe

British Dictionary definitions for Cadbury

Cadbury

/ (ˈkædbərɪ) /


noun
  1. George. 1839–1922, British Quaker industrialist and philanthropist. He established, with his brother Richard Cadbury (1835–99), the chocolate-making company Cadbury Brothers and the garden village Bournville, near Birmingham, for their workers

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012