carling

[ kahr-ling ]

nounNautical.
  1. a short fore-and-aft beam running beside a hatchway, mast hole, or other deck opening.

Origin of carling

1
1350–1400; Middle English <French carlingue<Scandinavian; compare Icelandic kerling keelson, literally, old woman; see carline

Words Nearby carling

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2024

How to use carling in a sentence

  • In her article, Middleton says that she used to "pine" after the now 48-year-old carling.

  • "I never have had such a thought about it," declared Mrs. carling.

    David Harum | Edward Noyes Westcott
  • "I hope it won't upset Julius," said Mrs. carling doubtfully.

    David Harum | Edward Noyes Westcott
  • "Thank you, Mrs. carling," responded John, with much sincerity.

    David Harum | Edward Noyes Westcott
  • These particulars were all related simply and unaffectedly before Mr. carling ventured on the confession of his attachment.

    The Queen of Hearts | Wilkie Collins
  • Socially, Mr. carling's position was but little affected either way by the change in his life.

    The Queen of Hearts | Wilkie Collins

British Dictionary definitions for carling (1 of 2)

carling

carline

/ (ˈkɑːlɪŋ) /


noun
  1. a fore-and-aft beam in a vessel, used for supporting the deck, esp around a hatchway or other opening

Origin of carling

1
C14: from Old Norse kerling old woman, carline ²

British Dictionary definitions for Carling (2 of 2)

Carling

/ (ˈkɑːlɪŋ) /


noun
  1. Will (iam). born 1965, English Rugby Union player; won 72 caps (1988–97); captained England to three Grand Slams (1991, 1992, 1995)

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012